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20100901
20100930
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a third happened here. we joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, live
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy's george -- middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of talks between israel and palestinians. the pope has described the uk as a third-world country. welcome to "bbc world news" -- broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also of around the globe. coming up later for you, against a backdrop of st. protests, france's lower house passes the bill which raises the retirement age from 60 to 62, and hope for track and chile's miners. -- trapped miners. a new arrival lists some of the gloom -- lifts some of the gloom. hello to you. millions of people across central and western africa are going hungry. yes, the numbers are in the millions. the worst of the country is even larger than the states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. delta been flooding of ruined crops, and some help has arrived, but it has not been enough. we have this special report. >> according to the united nations, development terms, it is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the united nations has been appealing to the internation
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
on the people, especially the children. >> they're getting to the heart of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger
writes the autobiography of our species. >> rose: right. >> so we are used to the story and we tell the story about the way we live. we train kid dpos to go to college. we train them in reasoning skills am we give them technical skills we have a series of strategies that people learn when they go into management. how to network, how to make decisions. and that is the story of human life told from the conscious level. but the revolution of consciousness tells us that below that level there's a more important and more fundamental level and more powerful and in some ways smarter level. and so my book is a description of life and the lives of two people told from that, of that underlevel. >> rose: the lives of two people. >> yeah, i make up characters. i have fictional characters just so exempt few. >> rose: but tell us about what you have found out about the unconscious mind. >> a couple things are important. the first is that we're shaped in so many ways by these unconscious decisions. in trivial ways, i mention by a study by a guy in buffalo that people named dennis are disproportion
, which have been used by thousands. no questions will be raised over the quality of construction -- now questions will be raised of the quality of construction. this was supposed to be india's coming out party, showcasing its global power. even now, organizers insist they are on top of things. >> the situation is under control. we are doing our best. we are confident we will be able to complete the entirety of the restoration. >> but not everyone is convinced. some officials say unless india acts quickly, the event could be in jeopardy. bbc news, delhi. >> next tuesday, there will be a conference, which is not news in itself, but this one is in north korea an extremely rare. the last time it happened, 30 years ago, kim jong-il succeeded his father. now with doubts about his health, there is speculation he is about to hand over to one of his sons. we have this from the south korean capital, seoul. >> this is the only photo of kim jong-un , taken two decades ago. almost nothing is known about him except that he comes from are ruthless and powerful bloodline. kim il-sung and his son, kim
but it really was an opportunity for us to try something new and better for our patients. >> lehrer: gwen ifill has a conversation with online editor and liberal commentator arianna huffington on her new book about the declining middle class. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks with composer and musician herbie hancock, whose 70th birthday tour fuses jazz with global beats. >> taking what happens and trying to make it work. that's something i add life >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a little tension between the two of you. >> no tensio
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
there on inauguration day. all the media attention. >> rose: 200,000 in germany. >> right. and so it's us. we're going to run the country. and so i don't think they understood the anxiety the country was feeling. i don't think they understood the post excess moment that we were going through and are still going through, of people feelinging that we've-- we've squandered things. we've overspent. we've spoiled ourselves. we haven't behaved responsibly. >> rose: we've lost something that is important to have, some quality that we had that made us as a country who we are. >> right. >> and a turn point which is forgotten. i guess the pastor he name was platt. >> david platt was a pastor at a megachurch and he said megachurches are too commercial, consumer christianity. we have to 3u8 back. and he is not the first to say that but he is part of it this moment where people are redefining what socially acceptable, the billing car, the hummer, that's no longer socially acceptable and it's part of i think a big cultural change, caused by the recession but caused by the sense that we haven't been responsible, tha
the dangers of secularism on his first state visit to britain. the human cost of the u.s. financial downturn as poverty levels rise to their highest level for nearly 50 years. e.u. summit row as president sarkozy lashing out against critics and vows to clear out illegal roma camps. >> french men and women have to know that this policy will continue while strictly abiding by the letter and spirit of our republican law. >> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, women in a man's world, the dangers of being a female candidate in afghanistan's election. and pakistan's hindus river may be flowing, but not international aid. the u.n. appeals for more money. hello, it is the first state visit by a pope to britain since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. the pope has been forced to acknowledge failings over pedophile priests and issued a warning about the dangers of what he calls aggressive secularism in britain. we look at an occasion that matches protocol with religious fervor. >> i
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
, who covers capitol hill for "the new york times." thanks for being back with us. so what's this delay all about? >> well, the senate clearly doesn't want to get embroiled in this issue before the election. it's just too unpredictable and the story line for democrats is clean, as things stand now. they're making the case that republicans would block tax relief for the middle class to hold out for tax break force the wealthy. republicans, of course shall want to extend those tax cuts for everyone. and so it's easier in the view of democrats to push this until a lame duck session. the political situation will obviously be less intense then. but as you said, the house speaker today left open the possibility of forcing a vote. and that could get really interesting next week. >> woodruff: now why the different calculus in the senate and in the house. >> the calculus probably isn't different. the conventional wisdom still is that in the end the house will decide to go home and campaign without taking this vote. but there's no reason for speaker pelosi to relent right now when she thinks she'
. and now the government tolerates night markets, where people can sell in the streets. police used to stop this kind of thing. now they let it happen. >> it signals there will be a very stable transition. and in north korea. it will take longer than one or three years. >> there is one other important player behind the scenes today, and that is china. china may be worried that north korea will inflow of with incalculable consequences for the in -- will in flowed with incalculable consequences for the entire region so, it is that closed mysterious country across the river -- it could mean that changes on the way for the family business. >> john since then, our world affairs editor there. at least seven people are confirmed killed. the rain collapsed a hillside, burying people in their homes as they slept. rescue workers have been struggling to reach the scene. 30 died in a mudslide in colombia. emergency services say the scale of the slide has made it rescue difficult across the country. 74 died in recent heavy rains. an egyptian court has reduced the sentence on a billionaire accused of kil
's new generation. >> the phrase that he kept on using time and again in his speech was my generation, the new generation. the reason he was doing that is he wants to separate himself away from tony blair and gordon brown and their eria in government. he was a very critical of the war in iraq. he said it was a wrong and that britain undermined united nations. not everyone in the hall like that. >> off iraq divided our party and our country. many sincerely believes the world face a real threat. i criticize nobody, faced with making the toughest decisions, and i honor my troops who fought and died there, but i do believe we were wrong. >> he was also critical on the labour record on regulating banks. he argued that britain did not do enough to make sure its economy was stable. the other thing he wanted to separate himself up from was the unions, the people who helped to elect him. he said he was not "red ed." he also said the unions should not give in to overblown rhetoric when it comes to opposing the cut from the deficit. he would not oppose every cut a coalition government proposed.
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
. these reports come from one of the hardest hit areas. >> the families that used to live here have homes and a community, but it was all swept away. it is a sad indication of how desperate people are. every time there is a car they are hoping we are here to help. weeks after the disaster, most are dependent on handouts and have no means of helping themselves. >> at least someone got something by the government. that is why i can honestly tell you nobody has died of starting. >> it is not going as smoothly as the government says. there is not enough aid to go around. this descends into chaos. flood victims tired of waiting for food take matters into their own hands with dozens jumping onto the aid trucks. the decision is made to get the vehicle away from the rest of the crowd. a truck is driven down the highway filled with people still trying to cling on. some managed to get off some distance away. the incident illustrated dave plight of so many across this nation -- the pitiful plight. >> a military court of sri lanka convicted the former military chief of corruption. sarath fonseka was
and they will do it. >> traditional rulers are better. they know our problems. they are dealing with us directly, so they know our problems. >> they are very careful with that. traditional rulers like to protect their personality. they tell you they will make sure. >> over the years, under both military and civilian rule, the power of these cheats and scammers has steadily been eroding. how did they continue -- the power of these chiefs and emirs has steadily been eroding. how do they continue their hold on power? >> date rule along with traditional institutions. it is not set in the media, but it is there. there are signs it will always be there and the people will always follow through on what the traditional institutions want. >> the history and culture of this place dates back centuries and little has changed in terms of tradition. i have come to meet an eim mir, granted a special audience. >> we do not order people to vote for anybody. all we do is ensure that our subjects do abide by the rule of the election. we do that to further the rule of the government. there should not be any discrim
father's successor. >> stay with us if you cannot on bbc world news. still to come -- a fifth of the world's plant species are now in danger of disappearing forever. first, she is said to be one of the most photographed people on our planet. a new exhibition of formal photographs document the life of britain's queen elizabeth in pictures. many were taken by her late sister's husband, the photographer lord snowden. >> on her right, mr. anthony armstrong jones. >> he was a society photographer who took pictures of the royals and then became one. tony armstrong jones's wedding to princess margaret was the society event of 1960. although he was not a member of the royal family, lord snowden continued to work as a professional photographer. alongside his documentary work, he was often called on to photograph the queen. many of his photographs have been included in a new exhibition, but the graphic portraits of the queen. here is an image of the monarch and her husband in the kind of formal pose you might expect, and the queen caught by a range of photographers' in less orthodox sur
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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